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THE world’s priciest pineapple - costing £1,000 per slice - is grown in CORNWALL

World’s priciest pineapple costs whopping £1,000 per slice and is grown in UK using poo

THE world’s priciest pineapple – costing £1,000 per slice – is grown in CORNWALL.

Although they’re not up for sale, growers estimate an entire fruit could fetch as much as £10,000.

Tropical fruit farmers keep the pineapple plants in wooden pits, kept extra toasty with horse manure.

Each plant takes two years to grow and only produces ONE of the spiky fruits.

But growers at The Lost Gardens of Heligan this week managed to harvest one.

THE world’s priciest pineapple - costing £1,000 per slice - is grown in CORNWALLThe tropical fruit cannot be naturally grown in the UK’s cold climate – but boffins in the 17th century developed a way to trick the plant into thinking it was warmer.

Pineapples were grown in the UK after Brits developed a taste for them in the tropics.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan, who make the expensive fruit, shared the pineapple between their 15-strong team – despite the hefty price tag they could get for it.

Dina, a part of the Productive Garden Team at the Lost Gardens of Heligan, said: “It was a momentous occasion for the team who were each treated to a small piece of lusciously juicy and deliciously tropical tasting fruit, just as you would have in the tropics! 

“After these years of hard work, it is almost sad to crop the fruit, however we take the crown and replant it, letting the pineapple live on to another harvest.” 

Including man hours looking after it, the transport cost of manure and maintenance, each pineapple costs them £1,000 to grow.

 

A spokesperson said: “Pineapples are a very labour-intensive fruit to grow. 

“In auction to the right buyer we believe a price around £10,000 may be imaginable, after all… where else can you buy a pineapple with such a story.”

It makes it the third most expensive fruit in the world – and the priciest outside Japan.

Ruby Roman grapes hit the top spot, selling for £7,500 per pound because of their huge size and sweetness.

And Yubari King Melons come in second at £7,200 – because of their perfect and totally smooth shape.

Traditionally, a  pineapple was seen as a status symbol and only served to the wealthiest and most important Brits.

THE world’s priciest pineapple - costing £1,000 per slice - is grown in CORNWALLThey grow in specially designed pits heated by a supply of fresh, composting manure, whose heat enters the mechanism through vents in the wall.

The gardens are quick to say that they do not taste like horse poo – but are actually some of the best tasting pineapples outside the tropics!

But they made sure to taste the first one just in case – before the Queen was given the second.

A Smooth Cayenne variety, the pineapples are thought to have been the first brought to Britain in 1819.

The plants in the pits were gifted to the Lost Gardens of Heligan by Kew Gardens, with others being acquired from the Caribbean.

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