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Venomous spiders set to enter our homes and breed this week

Venomous spiders set to enter our homes and breed this week

VENOMOUS spiders are set to enter our homes and BREED over the next few weeks, experts have warned.

Brits are being urged to stock up on medication to treat bites from false widows – which could be deadly.

St John Ambulance put out the stark warning as temperatures are set to drop now summer is over.

It said spiders will move into our houses to warm up, mate and multiply.

Venomous spiders set to enter our homes and breed this week
A false widow spider that left a couple too scared to go into their garden

Among them will be false widows – our most dangerous arachnid – which can give a nasty bite.

The first aid charity said we need to be prepared to be able to treat them.

A St John Ambulance spokesperson said: “With temperatures slowly dropping over the next few weeks, more of us will see spiders coming in from the cold to keep warm and breed.

“So St John Ambulance is issuing advice over what to do if bitten. 

“While spider bite reactions are typically mild and can usually be managed at home, in recent years there has been a rise in false widow spiders, which bite.

“And though not particularly venomous, its bite can feel like a wasp sting.  

Venomous spiders set to enter our homes and breed this week
Picture of a false window spider found at Morrisons, Northampton in September 2021

“More rarely, bites can be severe, causing intense swelling and irritation, and an allergic reaction. 

“A severe allergic reaction, also known as anaphylaxis, can develop in just seconds and can affect the whole body.

“If not treated quickly enough, it can be fatal. ” 

Steve Hatton, paramedic and Head of Clinical Operations at St John Ambulance said Brits should ensure home first aid kits are stocked with an epi-pen – if already prescribed – or antihistamines. 

He said, “Essentially, for most, spider bites of the UK variety are nothing more than an irritation. 

“However, in rare cases, a person will have a more serious anaphylactic reaction due to an allergy to the spider venom rather than the actual potency of spider venom, much like a bee or wasp sting.

“Others may later develop secondary complications such as infection of the surrounding skin which is more to do with bacteria – normally found on the skin – entering where the bite is, or because of scratching the itchy skin, creating a route for infection.” 

Symptoms of an allergic reaction include a red itchy rash, watery eyes, swelling of the hands, feet and face, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhoea.

More severe ones include difficulty in breathing, swelling of tongue and throat with puffiness around eyes, confusion and agitation, collapsing and unresponsiveness.  

In these cases, Brits are urged to call 999 or 112 immediately.

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